Enterprise value - Definition

The combined market value of the equity and debt of a business less cash and cash equivalents.

Enterprise value can be seen as the total value that a business would be worth if it was in a position of zero debt. In most instances it is a more appropriate measure of value than market capitalisation, because it does not take into account who owns the company, but simply by how it is run. The exception to this rule is the banking sector (whose business is lending and receiving money, so the calculation to add on debt does not work and leads to spurious figures). 

Brand Finance use enterprise value as a benchmark for our brand valuations, since brand is one of the many assets that make up the business. If you add up all the assets in a business (both tangible, like buildings and machines, and intangible, like patents, airport landing slots, a trained-up workforce, and also Goodwill) this gives you the enterprise value. Brand value is one piece in this puzzle (a bigger or smaller piece in different industries).

Unless explicitly stated otherwise, enterprise values on this website are figures obtained from Bloomberg (published with their kind permission), and they constitute the entire enterprise value of the company which owns the brand.

As a result of this, where several brands are owned by the same company (for example the company with the number 1 brand, Walmart, also own Sam's Club and ASDA, amongst others) all of the brand profiles will show the same enterprise value. 

Wikipedia definition

 

Enterprise Value (split by brand)

In specific instances (for example on particular charts of the brand comparison tool) we have carved up the enterprise value obtained from Bloomberg and apportioned pieces to individual brands, based on how much of a company's operations operate under each brand. This allows you to make sense of BV/EV figures (brand value as a proportion of the business value) by taking into account businesses that use more than one brand.

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